Georgia Disability History Symposium 2017: The Urgency of the Moment

October 5, 2017

I am thrilled to be a part of this event, which is free to attend. You can register online here and download a copy of the flyer as a pdf here.

2017 Disability Symposium-page-001

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See you at Creating Change in Atlanta!

January 3, 2013

I am excited to be presenting at the 2013 Creating Change Conference in Atlanta January 23-27. I will be presenting in two sessions at the conference:

Intersex: An Introductory Workshop

Friday, January 25, 2013 from 3:00-4:30pm

An estimated 1 in 2,000 children are born with genitals, chromosomes and/or reproductive organs that obviously fall outside of the (narrow) medical definition of male or female. Unfortunately children born with intersex conditions are often surgically mutilated at birth. Even when children are able to escape surgery, it is difficult to escape the stigma, shame and secrecy that come along with a body that doctors and society tell you is “different.” This workshop will include a basic introduction to intersex issues and activism, including Caitlin’s personal story and a screening of a short documentary on the topic.

Exploring Disability’s Intersectional Space in LGBTI Rights

Saturday, January 26, 2013 from 9:00-10:30am

Outreach, organizing, and advocacy efforts to secure rights for LGBTI people are often made at the expense of people with disabilities, either by ignoring them or perpetuating ableism. Not only does this impact the struggle of the disability-rights movement, but also obscures ripe possibilities for intersectional and collaborative efforts. This session seeks to deconstruct ableism in the LGBTI-rights movement and explore the commonalities between the two movements in hopes of starting a cross-movement dialogue.

For more information, registration and the complete schedule, please visit http://www.creatingchange.org/


For Caster Semenya, With Love

September 19, 2009

By: Moya Bailey, Caitlin Childs, and Mia Mingus

This is an outpouring of love for Caster Semenya. Wrong is not her name. What is wrong is the way she has been treated in global media. As three queer women, we have struggled with our own relationship to the feminine as it has been constructed in mainstream society. As a black woman set adrift in a sea of whiteness, it was hard to see myself as beautiful. My curves and skin color made me unattractive in my world. As a white, feminine woman who is also intersex, I have struggled hard to come to peace with my body. Doctors and the world around me have told me I am defective or have denied my existence entirely. As a disabled Korean adoptee, I grew up as an outsider, rarely seeing people who moved like me or reflected me in my community or in the media. I was constantly told that my body was something that needed to be “fixed;” that it was “wrong;” and that it, that I, was “undesirable.” We engage with each other as comrades, three queer women uniquely shaped by our lived identities and experiences. We were the odd ones out, queered by our bodies, but later we claimed our queerness with fierce intention and pride. Now we choose our difference, embrace what sets us a part from a constrictive mainstream. It is for these reasons that we feel a deep kinship with Caster Semneya. Her story unfolded internationally without her consent and knowledge. We write to right wrongs done to someone whose only crime was daring to be all that she is.

Read the rest here